Influences of Listening to Music in Study Break on Brain Activity and Parasympathetic Nervous System Activity

  • Kenji Moriya Department of Production Systems Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Hakodate College
  • Ikusaburo Kurimoto Department of Information Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Kisarazu College
  • Nobuo Ezaki Department of Information and Control Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Toba College
  • Masahiro Nakagawa Department of Electrical, Electronics and Information Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology

Abstract

Effective relaxation methods during and after a break from “study” (i.e., an experimental task involving a rock-paper-scissors game requiring concentration) were investigated in terms of prefrontal cortex and parasympathetic nervous system activity. Prefrontal activity was determined from changes in oxy-hemoglobin (Hb) and deoxy-Hb measured by 10-channel wearable optical topography, and parasympathetic nervous system activity was analyzed by high frequency components (HF) of fluctuations in instantaneous heart rate (IHR). In this study, we hypothesized that subjects would relax or experience reduced mental stress when prefrontal activity became inactive and/or the HF decreased. Relaxation tasks were used during the study breaks were as follows: (1) just resting (doing nothing); (2) deep breathing; (3) listening to an uplifting song; (4) listening to relaxing music; (5) listening to classical music. During study breaks in which subjects listened to three kinds of music, particularly uplifting songs, both prefrontal and parasympathetic nervous system activity tended to become inactive compared with a study break in which subjects did nothing or engaged in deep breathing. Furthermore, when the study task was performed a second time after a break involving doing nothing or listening to classical music, prefrontal activity tended to become more active in comparison with activity during the first study task.

Author Biographies

Kenji Moriya, Department of Production Systems Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Hakodate College
Kenji Moriya received a Ph.D. degree in engineers from Muroran Institute of Technology in 2001, and is presently a Professor at National Institute of Technology, Hakodate College since 2016. He has worked on bio-measurement engineering and signal processing. He is a member of IIAE, JSWE, JSEE and IEICE.
Ikusaburo Kurimoto, Department of Information Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Kisarazu College

Ikusaburo Kurimoto received a Ph.D. degree in Information Science and Technology from The University of Tokyo in 2009, and is presently a Professor at NIT, Kisarazu College. He is a member of IPSJ, SICE, JSEE (board director in 2017) and IEICE.

Nobuo Ezaki, Department of Information and Control Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Toba College
Nobuo Ezaki received a Ph.D. degree in engineering from Toyohashi University of Technology in 1996, and is presently a Professor at NIT, Toba College. He is a member of ISCIE, JSMBE, JSEE and IEICE.
Masahiro Nakagawa, Department of Electrical, Electronics and Information Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology

Masahiro Nakagawa received Ph.D. degree from Nagoya University in 1988, and is presently Professor of the department of science of technology innovation and the director of information processing center at Nagaoka University of Technology. His major discipline is concerned with non-linear phenomena in physical and physiological systems, e.g. chaos, fractal and neural networks, related to the brain function analysis focusing on the state-of-the-art in sensibility information engineering field. He is also a member of JPS, JSAP, JNNS, JLCS and IEICE et al.

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Published
2018-01-25
How to Cite
Moriya, K., Kurimoto, I., Ezaki, N., & Nakagawa, M. (2018). Influences of Listening to Music in Study Break on Brain Activity and Parasympathetic Nervous System Activity. Journal of the Institute of Industrial Applications Engineers, 6(1), 34. https://doi.org/10.12792/jiiae.6.34
Section
Articles